Written by Arthur G. Moore 4:48 pm kayaks

Touring the Caves with a Kayak

When you think of caves, what do you picture? Most people envision dark, cold and wet places with stalactites hanging from the ceiling. Exploring Caves by kayak would be an unusual experience that no one has ever had before! The adventure starts at a boat launch where we get into our kayaks for the initial paddle to the calmer waters in front of the cave entrance. We tie up our boats and start preparing for exploration by putting on helmets, headlamps and life jackets.

The first stop is usually just inside the cave entrance where some adventurous souls might walk down to investigate more closely while others prefer to stay close to their guide who points out interesting sights along the way like a large rock formation in the shape of a lion’s head. Exploring Caves by kayak is not just about viewing stalactites and stalagmites, there are other amazing discoveries to be made such as cave pearls which can form on the ceilings or walls after water seeps through limestone leaving behind perfectly round spheres that look like they were polished!

What are the benefits of kayaking in caves

Exploring caves by kayak is a great way of seeing the underground environment in ways that can’t be done with foot exploration. Explorers are able to see places they couldn’t reach on foot while experiencing how water flows over and shapes cave formations, such as stalactites and stalagmites. The boat also offers protection from sharp rocks and bumping into the ceiling or walls. Exploring caves by kayak is also a great way to see how cave animals live, such as bats who can be seen flying from one side of the cave wall to another looking for bugs!

How do you prepare for a trip to a cave

The best way to prepare for a trip into the cave is to have an experienced guide with you. Not only will they be able to show you how things work, but they can also help navigate through some potential dangers that may arise during your tour. Another key thing you’ll want before going on such a traversing adventure would be safety equipment, such as a helmet, headlamp, and waterproof gear. Exploring caves is often an exciting adventure – but it can also be very dangerous!

The best way to prepare for a trip into the cave is to have an experienced guide with you. Not only will they be able to show you how things work, but they can also help navigate through some potential dangers that may arise during your tour. Another key thing you’ll want before going on such a traversing adventure would be safety equipment, such as a helmet, headlamp, and waterproof gear. Exploring caves is often an exciting adventure- but it can also be very dangerous!

Caves Are Dark and Dangerous

Caves are often dark and dangerous, which is why you have to be extra careful while kayaking inside a sea cave. The unpredictability can make it much more challenging for a skilled kayaker. But that’s what makes it so thrilling. Explorers will often paddle into a cave to see how far they can go before the water becomes too shallow, and then turn around for another adventure!

Caves are also home to many creatures so kayakers have to be on alert at all times when exploring caves by kayak. Sea caves are also home to bats and other flying creatures, so kayakers need to be wary of any insects that might fly into the face. Exploring caves by kayak can give you a new perspective on life under water!

Unpredictable Waves

Sea caves are often exposed to the powerful and unpredictable waves, making it difficult for kayakers. Explorers need to be careful as they paddle into a sea cave because of these waves. Explorers should be aware of the waves and stay alert for any signs that a wave is coming. Exploring sea caves by kayak can feel like exploring an uncharted territory!

Powerful Waves Inside Caves

The water can often be much more powerful inside the cave than outside because of all of that constrained space. Explorers must be careful as they navigate the tight spaces inside of a cave.

Tide

The changing tide can have dramatic effects on the personality of a sea cave. Exploring sea caves at high tide can be a very difficult endeavor. Explorers need to keep this in mind before setting out on their kayaking journey of discovery. Low-tide explorations offer little challenge but also less reward for effort expended. Explorers may want to consult tidal charts beforehand so that they know when it will be possible to enter any particular cove or tunnel without being swept away by the advancing water – which is surprisingly strong! Even if an explorer gets caught by surprise, however, they can still be saved by a strong, healthy swimmer who might have the strength to reach them and drag them out of harm’s way. Exploring sea caves is an adventure that will leave you with not only stories but also some fantastic photographs for your personal scrapbook or website!

Place Spotter Outside

The observer of “place spotting” is to be placed outside the cave mouth looking in. Explorers should not use flash photography inside a sea cave, which can cause irreparable harm to sensitive ecosystems and create discomfort for other visitors who might experience seizures or migraine headaches as a result.

Each guide will take two groups into any one small section of the caves at one time so that they do not have to wait on line when exiting through single points like an entrance gate. Exploring by kayak offers greater flexibility than exploring on foot but still requires some physical activity such as lifting oneself up onto dry land from a wet surface after entering water and paddling against currents in places where it may be necessary to make progress.

Do I need to be an experienced kayaker 

No, not at all! Exploring caves by kayak is an adventure for the whole family. We offer tours that are suitable for beginner to experienced paddlers alike and it’s our goal to make them as fun and safe as possible.

A traversing adventure would be safety equipment, such as a helmet, headlamp, and waterproof gear. Exploring caves is often an exciting adventure- but it can also be very dangerous!

What gear should I bring on my trip 

We recommend that all participants bring some kind of water-tight container for storing and carrying gear. It’s also a good idea to wear clothing that is appropriate for the season, as well as sturdy shoes or boots just in case you’ll need to enter areas which require scrambling over slippery rocks.

Exploring caves is often an exciting adventure but it can also be very dangerous! It’s important to take the proper safety precautions before going on a trip. We recommend that all participants bring some kind of water-tight container for storing and carrying gear. It’s also a good idea to wear clothing that is appropriate for the season, as well as sturdy shoes or boots just in case you’ll need to enter areas which require scrambling over slippery rocks.

We recommend all participants bring their own PFD – personal floatation device – and it’s a good idea to wear one while touring any of our caves! All kayaks are equipped with their own Coast Guard approved PFD’s.

We recommend all participants bring their own waterproof container for storing and carrying gear, as well as sturdy shoes or boots just in case you’ll need to enter areas which require scrambling over slippery rocks. Exploring caves is often an exciting adventure but it can also be very dangerous! It’s important to be prepared for the unexpected.

We recommend that you wear clothing appropriate for the season, and bring a waterproof container to store gear if necessary. Exploring caves is often an exciting adventure but it can also be very dangerous! It’s important to be prepared for the unexpected. Exploring Caves By Kayak

Your tour will begin with a short orientation to get an overview of the group’s expectations and responsibilities.

We recommend all participants bring their own Coast Guard approved PFD, a personal water bottle or camelbak with at least one liter of water per person for the entire tour, sunscreen and sunglasses.

Last modified: June 18, 2021
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