Written by Arthur G. Moore 4:22 pm article

Tips for Solo Kayaking

Tips for Solo Kayaking

Do you like to paddle solo? Solo kayaking is a great way to explore the water, but it can be dangerous. Solo kayakers are vulnerable and must always be on their guard for wild animals or other people. Solo kayaking requires some special gear as well. If you’ve been thinking about taking up the sport, here are 10 tips for successful solo kayaking that will keep you safe and make your trip enjoyable!

Know Your Limits

Know your limits as a Solo kayaker. Solo paddlers are vulnerable and must always be on their guard for wild animals or other people, so make sure you can paddle solo at least 50 yards away from the shoreline before stopping to turn back. Solo paddling is also more strenuous than tandem paddling, which means that if you’re camping overnight in an area with bears around, never do it alone! You need to stay within shouting distance of another human being during any time when you stop moving because they may not be able to hear you over the noise of the water while you sleep.

If there’s no one else nearby who wants to go out on the water with you but doesn’t want you to paddle solo, it’s still possible. Solo paddlers can use a kayak with the rudder system that allows you to control your ferrying without having someone else in the boat.

Wear a Life Jacket

Wear a life jacket and make sure it fits properly. Solo kayakers are at a higher risk of injury from paddling, not to mention the potential risks that come with being out on the water alone.

As solo paddlers we need to be more aware of our surroundings and take note of any changes in weather or waves height before it becomes too dangerous for us.

If you’re going out in an area where there’s no one else around, wear bright clothes so you can easily be seen if necessary (this also helps others see your location). Solo kayaking is always a great experience but make sure you know what precautions are necessary when entering into this activity. There’s nothing wrong with taking some time enjoying nature without having anyone else on board!

It’s not all bad out there, solo kayakers can still enjoy a beautiful day on the water! Solo kayaking is not only fun but it’s also good for your health. Solo paddlers have to work hard and get in better physical shape than those that take a boat or other type of vessel because they’re constantly moving their legs back and forth while keeping time with their arm strokes. This is great exercise and you’ll feel healthier after giving it a try.

Dress for The Weather

Dress for the weather, including sunscreen, sunglasses, hat, and layers of clothing. Solo kayakers need to be prepared for anything!

If you can’t tell the weather ahead of time, layering is always a good option. It’s better to be too hot than too cold and it will make for quicker changes throughout your day on the water if needed! Solo kayakers need to wear sunscreen because they’re more exposed out there without any shade or shelter from trees. Sunglasses are also important as they protect against UV rays that could cause damage to eyes over long periods of exposure like hours in open water. Hats provide protection as well but some people find them uncomfortable so sunglasses might work just fine for those who want more sun coverage.

Give Yourself Plenty of Food and Drink

One big mistake solo paddlers make when going out for the day is not packing enough food and water. Solo paddlers need more fuel and fluids than those in a tandem boat do because they’re doing all the work! Solo kayakers should bring at least one bottle of drinking water for every hour on the water, or four bottles per day if you paddle out for eight hours each day.

For lunch, it’s always best to pack something like granola bars which will provide enough energy but won’t fill up your stomach too much before dinner time when that is usually eaten. Pack lots of high-calorie snacks such as nuts so that even if you end up not getting very many meals throughout the course of an outing due to lack of windfall opportunities or other unexpected circumstances (like forgetting food), you’ll have plenty to eat while you’re out on the water.

When packing food, make sure to include a variety of foods that will last for the duration of your trip. Solo kayakers should also bring along additional water, just in case they are stuck out longer than anticipated or can’t find a safe source on their route. Soloists need to keep an eye on the weather and have safety gear like flares and signal devices at hand when paddling alone so that they’re prepared if something goes wrong. When launching, be sure not to stand up too quickly as it could result in tipping over!

Have An Emergency Plan

Solo kayakers should also bring along additional water, just in case they are stuck out longer than anticipated or can’t find a safe source on their route. Soloists need to keep an eye on the weather and have safety gear like flares and signal devices at hand when paddling alone so that they’re prepared if something goes wrong. When launching, be sure not to stand up too quickly as it could result in tipping over! Don’t forget other essentials such as sunscreen, bug repellent, sunglasses and extra clothes because solo kayaking is often more difficult due to windy conditions which means you’ll stay wetter longer. Solo kayak trips require careful planning – make sure you know where your nearest emergency point of contact is located before setting

Bring a map of your route and don’t forget to mark it with landmarks every half-mile so that you can orient yourself if needed, or in case someone else needs to find you should something happen. Solo kayakers need to be especially mindful about their level of fitness because they may not get as much time for breaks when they are paddling alone, which means stretching is key! Solo kayaking also requires more strength than tandem kayaking does because soloists must do all the work themselves. Make sure you stretch before launching from shore and keep up an aerobic routine while away from home by doing jumping jacks between sets of five pushups throughout each day’s paddle session!

Short Journey

Keep your journey short and sweet – Solo kayaking is a great way to explore the coast of your city, but it’s not for long distances. Once you gain some experience, you can then branch out and explore more areas.

Don’t Panic If Things Go South

If you find yourself in a situation where things go south, it’s important to remember that the kayak is extremely buoyant. Soloists should be able to get themselves into an upright position and then climb back aboard by using their paddle as leverage under water or on top of the surface if they need help getting up! No need to press the panic button all the time, just keep calm and follow the tips for getting back on board your Solo kayak.

Last modified: June 20, 2021
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